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Morrisons garden plants 2017

Morrisons garden plants 2017


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Morrisons garden plants 2017

The 2016 season of Garden Pests of the Year is in the history books. We have compiled data for over 100,000 species in the garden, and identified just under 11,000 of them as pest species. If you’d like to read more about the data and results, see our previous blogs.

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2017 Garden Pests of the Year

The results from our data analysis were published as an ebook and in our garden magazine in early December 2017. The results are summarised in a list of the top 10 pest species, where we also included all the species that were observed in our garden.

For a longer list, including all the data, see our list of top garden pests, where you’ll also find more information about the Garden Pests of the Year Award and what it is all about.

If you have any comments or suggestions for further information or analysis, please feel free to contact us on the results email address below, or through the contact page of the website. We would also be interested to hear from you if you use the lists to select your garden pest control products, and your opinions and views on the analysis.

A. Species observed in more than half of the gardens surveyed

Larger species are more challenging and so take longer to eliminate. It is therefore only fitting that we would observe the first few pest species in our research to be among the larger species.

So, for all the garden pests that we know have an abundance of at least 0.25 per cent, and have been observed in at least 50% of the gardens surveyed (as well as those observed in at least 20% of gardens surveyed), here is a list of their status in relation to their importance:

Pest status in relation to the importance level

Importance 1: We have a high expectation that we will get it under control if we don’t find it or find very little of it.

Importance 2: We expect that we will get it under control if we find a low level, but not an entirely absent problem.

Importance 3: We expect that we may not be able to get it under control even if we find a problem.

So, here they are:

* Bats

Importance 1: Very likely

Importance 2: Likely

Importance 3: Not certain

Gardener Comments: Bats generally pose little problem, even as a nuisance. Occasionally they hang around in small numbers, and are likely to give you a bit of a shock if you happen to catch them asleep or in your garden, and they will certainly give you a bit of an adrenaline rush if they land in your face while you are weeding. Their droppings are sometimes annoying to deal with, and more often than not they can be picked up and dropped in the house for their value as fertilizer.

* Blue/Yellow Jackets

Importance 1: Very likely

Importance 2: Likely

Importance 3: Not certain

Gardener Comments: Blue and Yellow Jackets rarely pose much of a problem, although they are annoying if they start to hunt around inside the house. In the early years they were quite common, but the introduction of raccoons into this ecosystem in the early 1980’s made them rare by the time I first visited the area in the mid to late 1990’s. In some years, they were completely absent. When they were abundant, they were attracted to my garden by the abundance of wildflower seeds I distributed in my garden. In those years they were a nuisance, but not a true problem, and I can’t really complain about them.

* Cicadas

Importance 1: Very likely

Importance 2: Likely

Importance 3: Not certain

Gardener Comments: I think they are a very important part of the local ecosystem. At times of high activity, they can be loud, and they can create huge swarms that you won’t want to be near. Most people like them, and many people, when they are in the garden at times of year when they are not hatching, leave things in the ground to allow them to get on with their life. However, in a few years their numbers explode, and they can be quite a nuisance. You can tell they have hatched because the air is filled with their singing and when they fly into the house, they are often left in heaps on the floor or furniture. The sound of a mass cicada flight can sometimes shake the roof of your house. Sometimes they can get into the garden in a mass movement, and some years they are so numerous that they can overwhelm all of your garden plants. But if you have a good understanding of where they are in their life cycle and the best time to remove them, and you do it right, it can be a really great way to welcome a new year, especially if you have a garden in a forest.

* Cicadas

Importance 1: Very likely

Importance 2: Likely

Importance 3: Not certain

Gardener Comments: While they are generally not a major pest, they can be a problem, as I have noted before. Sometimes when they mass up they can become the source of the most annoying sound that comes out of your house. The song they sing is almost always annoying and sometimes you can hear them for an extended period, as they usually stop to chirp for a bit before starting up again.

* Caterpillars

Importance 1: Not certain

Importance 2: Not certain

Importance 3: Likely

Gardener Comments: A good look through your garden every couple of days can lead you to find caterpillars on your plants. Some caterpillars eat just one plant, but others can be so harmful that it is not good to get rid of them. They often have a characteristic caterpillar shape that, along with their color and their size, is usually very informative. They are generally not as common a pest as some other insects, but many gardeners like to get rid of them.

* Stink Bugs

Importance 1: Likely

Importance 2: Likely

Importance 3: Not certain

Gardener Comments: One of the worst pests that I see is stink bugs. These are insects that lay their eggs in your home, and when the tiny new bugs hatch out, they chew and eat their way through your house and can be rather bad.

They are easy to detect because their bodies have spots, or the entire body is dark, which stands out in your yard. They can be particularly damaging in the spring when they begin to lay their eggs, and in the fall when they hatch and begin to eat and grow in size.

* Mosquitoes

Importance 1: Not certain

Importance 2: Not certain

Importance 3: Not certain

Gardener Comments: Mosquitoes can cause problems as they are a disease carrier and they can transmit diseases such as West Nile Virus.

Mosquitoes are most common during summer and early fall, but they can hang around until early fall. One of the best ways to control them is to use the repellent on your skin. If you work in your garden, spray yourself when working near your plants. There are several repellents on the market. I particularly like a mosquito spray that is meant to be applied to clothing, like this one:

* Ants

Importance 1


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